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Seal pup repeatedly harrassed while trying to rest

     robin-lindsey-seamore-rocks-blog
Adding to a stretch of busy marine mammal responses the past few weeks by Seal Sitters MMSN, we received reports after the fact of people harassing a seal pup at a popular viewpoint park in West Seattle.

On Friday, the hotline received a call that someone was repeatedly “poking” a harbor seal pup on the beach. Our first responder was on the scene in record time, but both the seal and offender were gone. The seal did not return.

Photos of a seal pup resting at the same location were taken and posted the following Tuesday evening on the West Seattle Blog. The photographer commented that he had to warn people to leave the pup alone. Unfortunately, no one called the Seal Sitters’ hotline that day to ensure the pup’s safety.

SSMMSN’s first responders were out early on Wednesday morning, checking the beach to see if the seal might be onshore. The sand was empty, but they could see a glossy little head about 100 yards out from the pier, where the pup appeared to be foraging. The pup came ashore around 10am, nestling in the barnacle covered rocks below the sea wall (photo above). Access to the small pocket beach was promptly closed off with tape and informational signage that seals are protected by Federal law from harassment and harm.

Seal Sitters volunteers worked in shifts to answer questions from the public, educating hundreds about seal pups’ urgent need for rest against just 50% odds of survival their first year. The pup, nicknamed Seamor by a young volunteer, snoozed for many hours in the warm sun. As evening approached, the incoming tide and a large series of waves from a passing ferry headed for Bainbridge Island, swept over Seamor and the pup reluctantly headed out into the Sound.

Someone mentioned witnessing a person “lying on top” of the pup the day before. When the person finally got up and off, the frightened seal escaped into the water.

If you witness a marine mammal illegally being harassed, please take a photo to document the incident (do not put yourself at risk!) and contact NOAA’s Office of Law Enforcement @ 1-800-853-1964. In West Seattle, please call Seal Sitters, a member of NOAA’s West Coast Marine Mammal Stranding Network, first so we can get on the scene.

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Seamor returned to the small beach about 11am on Thursday, where Seal Sitters had been waiting patiently, anticipating the pup’s arrival. Once again, the area around the pup was secured so that he/she could rest as undisturbed as possible in a very busy urban location. On the street above, busses and motorcycles roared by. Not-so-considerate beach visitors cruised back and forth in cars, blasting music at ear-shattering decibels.

Somehow, though all the human chaos, Seamor did manage to get some sleep and rested under the watchful eye of Seal Sitters and rapt onlookers who peered into the spotting scope, allowing a closeup view of the white-coated pup. Around 9pm on this stunning evening, as the sun dropped behind the silhouette of the Olympic Mountains, Seamor finally flopped across the beach and disappeared into waves.

On Friday, expecting the pup’s return to that northernmost point of West Seattle, volunteers stood by. However, the area was busy with people walking and standing along the sea wall and there was very little beach to rest upon. We sighted a seal head glimmering offshore. Then, to our surprise, Seamor hauled out over 1/2 mile around the bend. Volunteers once again protected the beautiful little pup who snoozed until after 9pm. After waiting about 20 minutes to make sure there was no return trip to shore, tired volunteers gathered up stranding materials and finally went home to eat a very late dinner.

Seamor seems to be a pretty healthy pup, estimated to be about 4 weeks old and recently weaned. Wet rings around the eyes indicated that the pup is well-hydrated. The health of a pup can quickly take a downturn if not allowed to rest. Please make sure to call Seal Sitters hotline @ 206-905-SEAL (7325) promptly if you see a seal pup - or any marine mammal - onshore.
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